Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism

Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin


Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism

Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism

  • Title: Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism
  • Author: Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin
  • ISBN: 9780671622619
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback



The classic and essential guide for the educated, skeptical, and searching Jew, or for the non Jew who wants to understand the meaning of Judaism.If you have ever wondered what being born Jewish should mean to you if you want to find out about the nature of Judaism, or explain it to a friend if you are thinking about how Judaism can connect with the rest of your lifThe classic and essential guide for the educated, skeptical, and searching Jew, or for the non Jew who wants to understand the meaning of Judaism.If you have ever wondered what being born Jewish should mean to you if you want to find out about the nature of Judaism, or explain it to a friend if you are thinking about how Judaism can connect with the rest of your life this is the first book you should own It poses, and thoughtfully addresses, questions like these Can one doubt God s existence and still be a good Jew Why do we need organized religion Why shouldn t I intermarry What is the reason for dietary laws How do I start practicing Judaism Concisely and engagingly, authors Dennis Prager and Joseph Telushkin present Judaism as the rational, moral alternative for contemporary man or woman.


Recent Comments "Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism"

As a person converting to Judaism, I thought it was important to read as much on the topic as possible. I didn't want to ask my Rabbi "dumb questions" and there were ideas that I wasn't sure how to approach the topic to my Rabbi. Even if you aren't interested in Judaism, the questions in this book are still beneficial to read. Questions 4 and 6 for example, help educate anyone on the basics that we aren't normally taught.Judaism doesn't try to convert people into becoming Jews. There are no miss [...]

This book really helped me place Judaism in context with other major religious and philosophical schools of thought, and unexpectedly brought me to the point of understanding Judaism as a better viewpoint (in terms of morality and social justice) than all others. It was pretty breathtaking in doing so. It is, however, written from a distinctly conservative perspective. I don't agree with the take on intermarriage or (Dennis Prager's) near-mindless Zionism, but it was an informative book nonethel [...]

This book is best understood as an easily digestible first pass for those unfamiliar with, and perhaps vaguely skeptical of, the value of Judaism for a modern person. If it were approached as something more conclusive, it might come off as flip in its assurance that God is a Necessary Being without too much consideration given to David Hume's critique of the Design argument, and it might seem dated in the space it devotes to countering Marxism and counseling support for Soviet Jewry. It's certai [...]

I really enjoyed this book. In some ways, it gave me a better perspective of Judaism. If you substitute Mormonism for Judaism, much of the material discussed was very relevant. Of particular interest to me was the discussion of the observance of the Sabbath day.

Prager and Telushkin's The Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism is a somewhat dated but solid approach to observant Judaism. The book takes the form of responses to nine questions (Can one doubt G-d's existence and still be a good Jew? Why do we need organized religion or Jewish laws - isn't it enough to be a good person? If Judaism is supposed to make people better, how do you account for unethical religious Jews and for ethical people who are not religious? How does Judaism differ from Chri [...]

Some of the authors' arguments about ethical monotheism's superiority to secular humanism and other systems of thought are conclusory--they set up straw targets and then knock them down too easily and quickly. In spite of that, I enjoyed the book because it opened a window onto Jewish perspective with which I am largely unfamiliar (I am a non Jew) and it is nice to learn about something that's so important to so many people, even though I understand that the authors can't speak for every one of [...]

The first chapter/question is a must read for many people. However, the rest of the book is not as intelligently laid out as promised. In addition, I found myself quickly skipping pages or even entire sections due to deep philosophical disagreements: setting aside the obvious slant of orthodox Judaism and right-wing politics (which I can appreciate even if I disagree), I could not bear to read about the moral superiority of Judaism. Is this not the stuff of wars? Can be likened to Arianism? Perh [...]

I did like this book. There were several great points that were made, and ideas that I had not considered in the way presented in this book. However, there was also much that I did not agree with, and arguments that did not quite make sense if reasoned out fully. As with many books on a subject as wide ranging as religion, even within one religion, there is much to be debated within these pages, but the fact that it makes one think in a very detailed manner about your own beliefs and ideas is de [...]

Joseph Telushkin referenced this book often in his book about Hillel (which I enjoyed a lot), so I decided to check it out. Definitely got off on the wrong foot with the whole chapter about moral behavior necessitating the existence of God (I want to send a copy of Greg Epstein's "Good Without God" to these guys), but some of the other chapters about Jewish belief were interesting. Overall kind of browsed through it, since I picked it up to elaborate on things from another book.

That passing on practices and rituals are far less relevant to conveying to my children why my Judaism is so important to me than would be letting them experience the startling effects of my upholding the extremely high standards of the moral code to which I am choosing to hold myself and seizing opportunities to talk about and share the experience of my values with my children.

This book really helped me decide to begin the process of converting to Judaism. As a fully-fledged Jew now, I still come back to this book. One of the most fascinating and integral parts of my Judaism is ethics, and this book posses mostly ethical questions. Great book.

It's good to go back the basics. The wealth of information about actual Judaism and Jewish philosophy more than makes up for the lesser parts of the book, (e.g. the chapter on Zionism got a little weird). This book is intelligently written and can definitely be helpful for Jews and non-Jews alike.

A wonderful collection of answers to common questions about Judaism. Presented in a logical, pragmatic approach to dispelling myths and generating awareness about the Jewish faith. A must-read for anybody interested in becoming more observant.

If Ken Ham converted to Judaism and wrote a book about his new faith, this is what it would sound like.

If I wanted to see someone knock down a bunch of straw men, I'd put The Wizard of Oz on repeat. Once again, Prager=fail.

Intro to Judaism.

very insightful-easy to read and understand and thought provoking too.

I registered a book at BookCrossing!BookCrossing/journal/11132501

Excellent.

Decent introduction into Judaism for a non-Jew. Written in an expanded question and answer style.


  • Free Download [Psychology Book] ✓ Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism - by Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin ¿
    482 Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin
  • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Psychology Book] ✓ Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism - by Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin ¿
    Posted by:Dennis Prager Joseph Telushkin
    Published :2018-05-19T19:56:08+00:00