Doctor Who: The Natural History of Fear

Jim Mortimore


Doctor Who: The Natural History of Fear

Doctor Who: The Natural History of Fear

  • Title: Doctor Who: The Natural History of Fear
  • Author: Jim Mortimore
  • ISBN: 9781844350384
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Unknown Binding



IT IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE TO COPY OR ATTEMPT TO COPY ANY PERSONALITY OR MEMORY RELATED ARTICLE SHOWN OR DISPLAYED IN THIS PUBLIC THEATRE, INCLUDING THIS WARNING PUNISHMENT OR CONVICTION IS AN UNLIMITED REDUCTION OF AUTHORISED OVERTIME HOURS AND TOTAL PERSONALITY REVISION YOU ARE NOT PERMITTED TO BRING ANY JUKEBOX OR RECORDING EQUIPMENT INTO THIS PUBLIC THEATRE THIS WILLIT IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE TO COPY OR ATTEMPT TO COPY ANY PERSONALITY OR MEMORY RELATED ARTICLE SHOWN OR DISPLAYED IN THIS PUBLIC THEATRE, INCLUDING THIS WARNING PUNISHMENT OR CONVICTION IS AN UNLIMITED REDUCTION OF AUTHORISED OVERTIME HOURS AND TOTAL PERSONALITY REVISION YOU ARE NOT PERMITTED TO BRING ANY JUKEBOX OR RECORDING EQUIPMENT INTO THIS PUBLIC THEATRE THIS WILL BE TREATED AS AN ATTEMPT TO BREACH COPYRIGHT ANY PERSON DOING SO CAN BE EJECTED AND THE EDITOR MAY CONFISCATE SUCH ARTICLES WE ASK THE PUBLIC TO BE VIGILANT AGAINST ANY SUCH ACTIVITY AND REPORT ANY MATTERS AROUSING SUSPICION TO THEIR LOCAL CONSCIENCE THANK YOU.Public WarningFaction Against Character Theft


Recent Comments "Doctor Who: The Natural History of Fear"

This is an eighth Doctor story with Charley Pollard and C'Rizz as the companions, and is #54 in the Big Finish main range.A society where asking a question is punishable by personality overwriting/editing and the people have roles but no names. There's little or no individuality and the only diversion is the constant public broadcasts of the memories of the Doctor and his friends. But there's individuals here that are speaking with some particularly familiar voices Dark and depressing for much o [...]

Confusion and altered personalities and a dystopia, oh my!

Not an easy audio to listen to and definitely not your typical Doctor Who. Heck, it's barely a Doctor Who at all. Still, if I absolutely had to choose one favourite DW thing, this would be it.A dystopian vision of a totalitarian regime, that's only one of the many facets to this story, though it's the one to set the tone and the mood. On other levels, this is very a much a meta-Who, an homage to the show's long and rich history, as well as a reflection of the Doctor's role as a popcultural icon [...]

This audio was another one of my favorites. The random announcements from Light City and the whole setting gives it almost a "Big Brother" or "1984" vibe, which is quite eerie. It starts off a little confusing and somewhat slow, but it quickly gains momentum and turns into an eerie tale with an amazing plot twist. It took a couple listens, but it has quickly grown on me!

I thought that The Natural History of Fear was going to be rubbish as well, as it seemed that we must find out eventually that there is some secret plan that the Doctor and companions are working on. But it didn't come, and didn't come, and so the eventual revelation of What Was Really Going On totally subverted my expectations.

I keep listening to it again and again and I'm still mesmerized and captivated by it, by its pacing, characters, literary style, rhythm, plot twists, construction, vision, all of it. It's poetic, creepy, startling, symmetrical, hypnotising, absolutely awesome.

A story that tries hard to be good but isn't much Like the 8th Doctor stories of the time really 4/10

This is hard to review. "The Natural History of Fear" is incredibly ambitious playing almost acrobatically with shifting narrative, but it leaves me a little cold by the end. Essentially a riff on "1984", it tries to style itself into something else and almost gets there, but not quite.Absolutely astonishing sound design, brilliant performances and a startling twist at the end leave me impressed, but not terribly moved.I waver between 3 and 4 stars here, but I'll round up to express how much I a [...]

Well, this was a lot better, if very, very confusing much of the time. Basically, the three regular voices - Charley, C'rizz and the Doc are heard playing a succession of characters, as the bodies they are in are wiped of memories and reprogrammed when they run afoul of the 1984-esque city state they live in. It's a mish mash of that aforementioned dystopia, a dash of V For Vendetta and a smidgeon of metafictional pomo-lite. In short, I am not deeply impressed by the plot, even though many fans [...]

I've swung back and forth on how I feel about this drama as I've listened through it. At the start I thought it was superb: intriguing dystopia that keeps just the right side of being referential and not derivative, atmospherically produced and expertly acted. As the story wore on, roles switched and the convolutions of the plot began to grow ever more complex and harder to follow, I began to feel as if the drama as a whole was perhaps a little less than the sum of its parts. By the end, I'd fal [...]

I did enjoy this. It was nice to listen to a story that was so different from all the others. Paul McGann did a really great job in this. The only short fall was that the dystopian society was so closely modelled on 1984. Given how many different dystopia and alternate realities Philip K Dick has come up with it would have been nice to have seen them have had a bit more originality in the story. The different twists and turns were very good, each episode revealing more but it was a bit confusing [...]

A highly experimental story. It's important to understand that we're dealing with an unreliable narrator here, which makes for a difficult tale. The Doctor, Charley, and new companion C'Rizz arrive in Light City -- your typical utopian dystopia -- and upset the status quo to an alarming degree. This one needs to be listened to at least twice -- a second time after the paradigm-shifting fourth part calls into question everything from the first three parts.

A vintage 1984 with a bouquet of 12 Monkeys, some Blade-runner spice and a slight Matrix after taste. I absolutely loved this one. It was another experimental, trans-dimensional set up with a great deal of weirdness and sound play that worked out to great affect in this one. The title sequence even works into the story and when the Light City bulletins popped up it gave me a chill. Paul McGann and India Fisher are absolutely brilliant in this. Love, love, loved it! Great listen.

This was pretty good, though definitely an atypical Doctor Who audio in that the Doctor and Charlie are not really themselves for most of it. Eighth Doctor loves to lose his memory, doesn't he? In some ways, the TV episode "The Beast Below" got a memory-wipe storyline down better, but at the same time, this audio has more time to go deeper and establish the society in which the story occurs. This is more of a 3.5 for me.

This is an unconventional story. People who sound like the Doctor and his companions are part of a big brother type society. They are doing the worst thing possible, asking questions. It's a clever story that has some very good twists. The only reason I gave it 3 stars was that I felt that there were an awful lot of unanswered questions at the end. All the actors give great performances. A good listen.

Big Finish's work can get a bit repetitive. Doctor arrives on a planet, bad guys show up, run down some tunnels, explosion, off to the next adventure.This one's different. This play really uses the format to its utmost. And it's really, really good. Listen to it without getting spoiled.

"Eternity in a snowflakeIs it me? Or is it you pretending to be me?"Ending's got my head in a bit of a spin. Fantastic Performances in this. Paul McGann gives me the happy shivery chills! :) (Performances w/a capital 'P', mind you. It's important.) I really enjoyed this one.

A stunningly ambitious story from Jim Mortimore that has more twists than a twizler. This is Doctor Who/1984 with a dash of insanity thrown in. There are many thematical layers here (reincarnation, identity, etc). It's too much to cover in a small paragraph. Try it for yourself.

The Doctor and Charley are on a planet that surprises its people from asking questions or knowing their history. They got made into citizens of the state and fight to gain their individual identities back. Confusing in the beginning but makes more sense as the adventure goes on.

In Light City, a prole can remember details from the Information which have not yet been shown, about the three characters the Doctor, Charley and C'rizz, and is brought before the Editor for daring to ask Questions, a terrible Thought Crime.

A bit better than the previous pair in the series. Plopped straight into a Brave-New-World riff without explanation. Interesting but far from my favorite entry.

Still in the vein of very odd stories. Wish allowed 1/2 ratings for a 3.5.

happiness through acceptanceproductiovity through happiness

I guess that was supposed to be a twist ending but by the time it came around I honestly didn't care anymore.

Brilliant with a lot of social commentary and digs at the series itself. Loved the twist at the end - I need to go and relisten knowing that now. It sheds a different light on the whole story.

Do you ever listen to an audiobook and just squeal occasionally because it's wonderful?

Dystopia. Plot twists. Personality revisions. Weird music. Unanswered questions.


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    Posted by:Jim Mortimore
    Published :2018-05-16T01:05:30+00:00